Makeover

The expression makeover is often used when something is made looking better than before. Today we usually hear the word in context with image-editing.

Photoshop or GIMP, but especially Photoshop are well-known applications which enable us to edit something or someone the way we want.

Sometimes people even use Photoshop as a verb.

For example:
“I photoshopped her spots away.”

People today think too much about beauty and unreachable idols who are (more or less) just like ordinary people. There’s nothing different, they have eyes, legs and so on. So do we. What we think to be seeing when we’re looking at a poster or commercial in TV is not real. It’s fake. Deliberately fake. Because big companies want to sell all their products to make you think that you need it. Actually, we don’t need most of it. When you think, and I hope you don’t but just in case you do, that if you look into your own mirror at home you have to look like a model in commercials I have to say: “You don’t and never will do!” It’s simply not possible. You need a dozen people to do the makeover and look like a model. Nothing you see in all those tabloids is real nature.

Morpheus: Welcome to the real world.

Don’t reach for stars which don’t exist. Reach for stars which are worth to be reached.

I hope I haven’t offended anyone out there and if I have I’m sorry but I have just written the plain truth.

Vocabulary:
well-known = famous, a lot of people know about it
to enable = make possible
spots = those hated red dots in one’s face
ordinary = not special, like everyone
commercial = advertisement, ad, method to sell a product
fake = not real, not truth

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